Xmas fever grips nation

IMG_20161216_121018The Christmas fever is gradually gripping the country following the successful execution of last week’s general elections.
The Christmas euphoria which used to be noticed early December appeared to have been put on hold as the electioneering campaign leading to the 2016 polls took centre stage.
With the polls done and dusted, traders in Accra say sales ahead of the Christmas festivities are gradually picking amidst heavy vehicular and human congestion with streets leading into the central business district clogged with cars and humans.
When The Ghanaian Times visited some principal markets in Accra, Christmas-related wares were on display as traders used various means to entice customers who had visited the market to do some brisk shopping.
Among the things on display were Christmas trees, cutlery sets, children’s ware, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery, canned food, perfumery, among others.
Some of the traders displayed banners announcing varying percentage reductions of price on their wares.
A clothing shop at Tudu, had the inscription: “50% Discount. Reduced to clear.”
Prices for children’s wears like shoes ranged from GH¢30 and GH¢50, pair of trousers and a shirt for boys were going for between GH¢50 and GH¢80, while dresses for girls went for between GH¢70 and GH¢120 depending on the size and quality.
For female adults, a half piece of ‘high target’ cloth sold at GH¢60, and GTP cloth went for between GH¢100 and GH¢120. Shirts for adult men, depending on quality, were selling at between GH¢30 and GH¢70 as prices for their shoes stood at GH¢40 or more.
Prices for cutlery sets, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery and perfumery varied in all the markets as traders bargained with their customers as to which price was reasonable to persuade them let go off them.
Traders and customers who were still in the post-election jubilation mood displayed their New Patriotic Party (NPP) paraphernalia amidst dancing to the ‘Onaapo’ tune, the official music for the John Mahama reelection bid which has since become the victory song for the NPP.
This has led to thick vehicular traffics on major streets leading to the central business district.
The markets visited included Makola, the Rawlings Park area, Kantamanto, Tudu, Kaneshie and Tip-Toe lane at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle.
One enthusiastic trader who sells children’s ware, Ama Ampadu, with the NPP scarf tied around her head told The Times that trading was booming by the day since Monday December 12, 2016.
She was happy the election had passed without hitches to enable them return to their sources of livelihood.
Another one, Courage Armarh, who sells men’s wear said demand has been high after the results of the polls were declared.
He was however hopeful that trading for the Christmas would hit its peak later next week.
A shopper Martha Darko, with her five-year old daughter, said she had decided to do early shopping to avoid any last minute rush.
The Christmas fever is gradually gripping the country following the successful execution of last week’s general elections.
The Christmas euphoria which used to be noticed early December appeared to have been put on hold as the electioneering campaign leading to the 2016 polls took centre stage.
With the polls done and dusted, traders in Accra say sales ahead of the Christmas festivities are gradually picking amidst heavy vehicular and human congestion with streets leading into the central business district clogged with cars and humans.
When The Ghanaian Times visited some principal markets in Accra, Christmas-related wares were on display as traders used various means to entice customers who had visited the market to do some brisk shopping.
Among the things on display were Christmas trees, cutlery sets, children’s ware, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery, canned food, perfumery, among others.
Some of the traders displayed banners announcing varying percentage reductions of price on their wares.
A clothing shop at Tudu, had the inscription: “50% Discount. Reduced to clear.”
Prices for children’s wears like shoes ranged from GH¢30 and GH¢50, pair of trousers and a shirt for boys were going for between GH¢50 and GH¢80, while dresses for girls went for between GH¢70 and GH¢120 depending on the size and quality.
For female adults, a half piece of ‘high target’ cloth sold at GH¢60, and GTP cloth went for between GH¢100 and GH¢120. Shirts for adult men, depending on quality, were selling at between GH¢30 and GH¢70 as prices for their shoes stood at GH¢40 or more.
Prices for cutlery sets, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery and perfumery varied in all the markets as traders bargained with their customers as to which price was reasonable to persuade them let go off them.
Traders and customers who were still in the post-election jubilation mood displayed their New Patriotic Party (NPP) paraphernalia amidst dancing to the ‘Onaapo’ tune, the official music for the John Mahama reelection bid which has since become the victory song for the NPP.
This has led to thick vehicular traffics on major streets leading to the central business district.
The markets visited included Makola, the Rawlings Park area, Kantamanto, Tudu, Kaneshie and Tip-Toe lane at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle.
One enthusiastic trader who sells children’s ware, Ama Ampadu, with the NPP scarf tied around her head told The Times that trading was booming by the day since Monday December 12, 2016.
She was happy the election had passed without hitches to enable them return to their sources of livelihood.
Another one, Courage Armarh, who sells men’s wear said demand has been high after the results of the polls were declared.
He was however hopeful that trading for the Christmas would hit its peak later next week.
A shopper Martha Darko, with her five-year old daughter, said she had decided to do early shopping to avoid any last minute rush.
The Christmas fever is gradually gripping the country following the successful execution of last week’s general elections.
The Christmas euphoria which used to be noticed early December appeared to have been put on hold as the electioneering campaign leading to the 2016 polls took centre stage.
With the polls done and dusted, traders in Accra say sales ahead of the Christmas festivities are gradually picking amidst heavy vehicular and human congestion with streets leading into the central business district clogged with cars and humans.
When The Ghanaian Times visited some principal markets in Accra, Christmas-related wares were on display as traders used various means to entice customers who had visited the market to do some brisk shopping.
Among the things on display were Christmas trees, cutlery sets, children’s ware, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery, canned food, perfumery, among others.
Some of the traders displayed banners announcing varying percentage reductions of price on their wares.
A clothing shop at Tudu, had the inscription: “50% Discount. Reduced to clear.”
Prices for children’s wears like shoes ranged from GH¢30 and GH¢50, pair of trousers and a shirt for boys were going for between GH¢50 and GH¢80, while dresses for girls went for between GH¢70 and GH¢120 depending on the size and quality.
For female adults, a half piece of ‘high target’ cloth sold at GH¢60, and GTP cloth went for between GH¢100 and GH¢120. Shirts for adult men, depending on quality, were selling at between GH¢30 and GH¢70 as prices for their shoes stood at GH¢40 or more.
Prices for cutlery sets, toy guns, cars and games, jewellery and perfumery varied in all the markets as traders bargained with their customers as to which price was reasonable to persuade them let go off them.
Traders and customers who were still in the post-election jubilation mood displayed their New Patriotic Party (NPP) paraphernalia amidst dancing to the ‘Onaapo’ tune, the official music for the John Mahama reelection bid which has since become the victory song for the NPP.
This has led to thick vehicular traffics on major streets leading to the central business district.
The markets visited included Makola, the Rawlings Park area, Kantamanto, Tudu, Kaneshie and Tip-Toe lane at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle.
One enthusiastic trader who sells children’s ware, Ama Ampadu, with the NPP scarf tied around her head told The Times that trading was booming by the day since Monday December 12, 2016.
She was happy the election had passed without hitches to enable them return to their sources of livelihood.
Another one, Courage Armarh, who sells men’s wear said demand has been high after the results of the polls were declared.
He was however hopeful that trading for the Christmas would hit its peak later next week.
A shopper Martha Darko, with her five-year old daughter, said she had decided to do early shopping to avoid any last minute rush.

 

By Julius Yao Petetsi

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