THE UNJUSTIFIED CAMPAIGN PROMISE DEMANDS

Ghanaians have elected a new government and President who will take office from January 7, 2017.

The President-elect, is in the process of forming a government and rolling out his programme for the four-year term that will end in 2020.

While on the campaign trail, the then candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP), now President-elect, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, made promises to the electorate that got him elected as President.

Surprisingly, just a few days after the declaration of the results and with the President-elect yet to take office, some of the electorate have began demanding the fulfillment of the campaign promises. That, for us is inappropriate and unjustified.

As a matter of fact, the President-elect can only fulfil the promises only after taking office and, therefore, all those who are demanding him to fulfil the promises are doing so ignorantly.

There cannot be any justification for the demands now even though it may be true that expectations are high. It is also true that with the change of government, many people look forward to better living conditions and hope for the future.

Many would hope that in the shortest possible time their lives would change for the better but the task ahead in all honesty is enormous.

The government must first take office, roll out its programmes and draw up a budget before beginning to implement its agenda for the country.

Fortunately, the President-elect, Nana Akufo-Addo, has promised to keep all the promises he made. It is, therefore, important for all of us to exercise a lot of patience and be moderate in our expectations.

It is true that the in-coming government made promises but that should not be used to put undue pressure on the government that is yet to take office.

We, therefore, appeal for restraint, to allow the government to take office and start the implementation of its programmes, before we demand the fulfillment of the promises.

It is absolutely premature to demand anything from a government that is yet to assume office and cannot implement any programme now.

We must all, therefore, be mindful of this limitation and desist from putting undue pressure on the incoming government.

The Times is more than hopeful that once the government takes office and begins the implementation of its programmes, the promises would be fulfilled.

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