STOPPING THE PROTOCOL LIST SYSTEM

THE Minister of Education, Nana Jane Opoku-Agyemang, yesterday send a strong signal to powerful and influential people in society that the Ministry would not tolerate protocol request for placement of their  children and wards in well endowed senior high schools this year.

She explained that, the protocol list system was denying students from deprived schools the opportunity to attend first class schools in the country.

The view of the Education Minister, who was speaking at the launch of the Integrated E-Learning Laboratories Project (IELP), in Accra, appears to be shared by majority of Ghanaians.

For a very long time, protocol list had been used by the powerful and influential people in society at the expense of poor and vulnerable children in the country.

For the Times, the Education Minister was only re-echoing what many Ghanaians have been speaking against, but had little power to prevent.

The process of placing students in their schools of choice have gone though several reforms, all geared towards giving the students a fair chance of being placed in their school of choice.

Indeed, many Ghanaians were happy with the introduction of computerised   placing, which was expected to be a fairer method of placing students in schools.

But has it really been a fairer way of placing students in Schools? The answer is obviously no.  Many are dissatisfied with the computerised placing system, and to make matters worse, the protocol list is used to interfer in the placement process.

It is, therefore, not surprising that the Minister of Education is seeking to stop the protocol list system to ensure fairness.

We are aware that stopping the practice would not be easy.  The powerful and influential people in society would continue to exert pressure on the school authorities to bend the rules, but with determination, we are pretty sure that the practice can stop.

Too many children have been unduly denied the opportunity to attend the well endowed schools, but we hope that the decision by the Ministry would help us end the practice.

While commending the Education Minister for this bold initiative, we laud the ministry for the efforts to upgrade some of the less-endowed schools in the country into viable education institutions, to prevent the rush for admission into first class schools.

 

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