Phase 1 of Ada sea defence project completed

Heavy machines being used to dredge the sea for the construction of the sea defence wall. INSET: Mr. Andre Olivier (right)  briefing    Dr.  Mensah (middle) on the project.                                                                                                                  Photo: Hannah Nkrumah

Heavy machines being used to dredge the sea for the construction of the sea defence wall. INSET: Mr. Andre Olivier (right) briefing
Dr. Mensah (middle) on the project. Photo: Hannah Nkrumah

The Minister of Water Resources, Works and Housing, Dr. Kwaku Agyeman Mensah, on Tuesday toured the construction site of the Ada Sea Defence Project in the Dangme East District of the Greater Accra Region, to acquaint himself with the progress of work.

The first phase of the project, which involved the construction of seven groynes and other onshore works, has been completed, while work is progressing steadily on the second phase, comprising mainly beach nourishment and protective barriers.

The project, which commenced in 2012, if completed, would reclaim 15 kilometres of coastal bed lost along the Atlantic Ocean in this area, and end the decades-long perennial tidal flooding menace that the people of the area have suffered.

Being constructed by International Marine and Dredging Consultants (IDMC), the 165 million Euros project is expected to stabilise the coastline, protect communities that suffer the rage of the sea periodically, increase tourism along that area, and increase the investor confidence in persons willing to invest in the Ada coastal belt.

At the time of the visit,   earth-moving machines were at work, and other workers on site to ensure that the November 2015 deadline, was met.

Dr. Mensah briefing the media after the tour, expressed satisfaction with the progress of work and assured of government’s continuous support to ensure that the project, 85 per cent completed thus far, met the deadline.

He said the government was committed to protecting towns along the beaches from the wrath of tidal waves, in the spirit of making the life of the citizenry better.

He said apart from the intended purpose of the project, about 300 people, mainly from the communities affected, had also benefited from employment opportunities accompanying the project.

Mr. Andre Olivier, the project manager, said with the collaboration of all stakeholders, his firm would meet the deadline.

He mentioned some of the challenges encountered during the construction as unsubstantiated claims by the local people regarding the felling of some coconut trees to pave the way for the project.

The flooding menace, he said, would be a thing of the past if the project was completed, and urged the government to do well to protect the coastal belt since the water level of the sea was expected to rise as the years passed by.

Some of the indigenes who spoke to The Ghanaian Times, said the completion of the sea defence project would come as a relief to them as their homes would not be flooded anytime the sea level rose.

“We are very grateful to the government for considering our plight and extending this project here. Now we can say the sea flooding that we have experienced over the years, would be part of our history,” Kwame Lomotey, an opinion leader in the area, said.

 From Julius Yao Petetsi, Ada

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