Denkyira Obuase now known as New Obuase

President Akufo-Addo at the site where Major Maxwell Mahama died

President Akufo-Addo at the site where Major Maxwell Mahama died

The Chiefs and people of Denkyira Obuase in the Upper Denkyira District of the Central Region, have renamed the town  “New Obuase,” as a sign of remorse, following the lynching of Captain Maxwell Adam Mahama, in the town in May, this year.
“We are saddened by the event. It was a bad day for the region and the country. It was unfortunate, and I plead that we all forgive,” the acting Omanhene of Denkyira, Nana Adjei Nkyiriyie pleaded at an emotional durbar held here on Monday to welcome President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo to the town as part of his six -day tour of the Western and Central regions.
“Seventy days ago, the event was bad and we all have to sacrifice to end instant injustice and not to take the law into our hands, ” Nana Nkyiriyie said.
He expressed his condolences to the family of Captain Mahama and the Ghana Armed Forces and the entire nation.
“I have, with the elders of Denkyira Obuase, declared no to instant injustice. This town will no more be known as Denkyira Obuase. We will now be called New Obuase.”
According to Nana Nkyiriyie, the event gave the community a “bad name,” adding that, it was not the character and image of Denkyiraman.
Responding, President Akufo-Addo said the event was not a “good news” for the country, stating that it should offer lessons for the security, the judiciary and the bar, to deal with all those who flouted the laws.
“We don’t want this in the country. If it is true that they (accused) broke the law, they should be dealt with by the court. Let this be the last time in the country.” he added.
He said, although, he was saddened by the tragic death of Captain Mahama, he had  to forgive the people of Denkyira Obuase.
“I came with a lot of sadness in my heart but I have forgiven you. I have come to encourage you, we will not forget you. We have good programmes for you,” President Akufo-Addo said, adding that “I am with you.”
Ghana, he told the durbar, was an accolade for law and order and democratic values, which were good ingredients for peace, and therefore, the citizenry must endeavour to sustain that standard.

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