CHRAJ Bemoans Delay In Re-Imbursement



RICHARD  A.QUAYSON-DEPUTY  COMMISSIONER-CHRAJ (2)The Commission for Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), has expressed concern about the delays in reimbursing service providers of the National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) for services rendered to patients.

It said such practices had the potential of threatening the sustainability of the NHIS and quality healthcare delivery.

Consequently, it has asked government and the NHIA to take steps to ensure that all outstanding arrears to service providers are paid within the next six months and thereafter outstanding claims do not exceed two months.

The Deputy Commissioner of CHRAJ, Mr. Richard Quayson made the call when he presented the highlights of the 2013 CHRAJ report on the State of Human Rights in Ghana, in Accra.

He also tasked the Ministry of Health (MOH), the Ghana Health Service (GHS) and NHIA to review tariffs payable to health centres as well as take into account the rising cost of treatment provided under the scheme.

He further urged the GHS to take steps to sensitise the public on the services that could be rendered, the disease coverage and the available medicine list, under the NHIS, to help reduce the delays in registration and renewal under the scheme.

In a related development, the Commission said it was gravely concerned about the high number of children living in the country’s refugee camps which are known to have poor facilities for child development.

The camps include Gnani, in the Yendi Municipality, Kutuo, in the Narumba District and Tindaan Shayili Kpatinga, in the Gushegu District of the Northern Region.

According to Mr. Quayson, the report indicated that the population of females, especially, in the camps, continues to increase, notwithstanding the numerous national and international attention at these camps.

The Commission, however, commended government for its interventions at the camps through its Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty Programme (LEAP). By Linda Aryeetey

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