ATU students develop anti power theft meter

Eric Gyamfi Owusu-Oduro(third from right) a student of ATU explaining the works of prepaid energy theft detection meter to Professor Achio(in smock) during the exhibition.Photo.Ebo Gorman

Eric Gyamfi Owusu-Oduro(third from right) a student of ATU explaining the works of prepaid energy theft detection meter to Professor Achio(in smock) during the exhibition.Photo.Ebo Gorman

Electrical Engineering students of the Accra Technical University have manufactured a prepaid meter that can send an alert signal to the Electricity Company Ghana (ECG) whenever a customer tempers with the meter.

The meter has an inbuilt sensor that sends a short message service (SMS) to the of ECG to alert them of an illegal attempt.

This device which is expected to curtail illegal connection of electricity was displayed at an exhibition held to commemorate the World Youth Day held at the university in Accra on Thursday.

Currently, the ECG loses about GH¢ 78 million annually through illegal connection.

The university plans to send the device to the ECG for assessment and possible adoption.

Other innovative products including a water purification machine, an automatic fire and flood detection gadgets that gives SMS signals to homeowners.

The day was marked on the theme, “Skills development to improve youth employment”

Speaking at the ceremony that brought together students, lecturers and stakeholders in the educational sector, the Vice Chancellor of the university, Professor Sylvester Achio called for more resources for technical education.

He was confident that the development of Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) was the solution to the country’s youth unemployment situation.

Professor Achio said although the government through the Council for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (COTVET) has embarked on several initiatives to increase access and enhance technical and vocational education, more awareness was needed to encourage the youth to pursue TVET  programmes.

He noted that the capacity of TVET institutions to realise their potential in the country was limited by a number of factors which include people’s attitude to vocational training, inadequate tools and equipment for practical training, poor funding and outdated curricula.

In order to address these challenges, Prof. Achio said TVET should be demand driven to create a system that is flexible and have a high rate of stakeholders concern and participation to make the institutions and products more attractive to employers.

“The curricula of TVET institutions are designed in the form of the competency base, with the industry partner’s involvement, however the quality and number of equipment and human resources to run the programmes well is a challenge,” he noted.

By Bernard Benghan & Douglas Ackah-Badu  

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