A call for leadership in fight against corruption

Dear Editor,

Every government wants to see Ghana developed to the extent that its people will live well with, at least, the basic social amenities of life. Every government also knows that corruptionis a bane on Ghana’s development. However governments are unable to deal effectively and ruthlessly with this “limiting factor” called corruption to Ghana’s development.

Every wise leader who has the people’s interest at heart and seeks to improve their lot will first identify all hindrances (of which corruption is chief) to the development of the society and tackle them by the root.

Why the root but not any part of the tree? The root holds the tree. If it is dealt with there is no tree. And the root is very near the leader. Indeed the root is in the leader! It is only when a leader kills self to corruption that he/she becomes alive to fight it. The tone at the top would then be right and it will permeate to the middle and to the bottom.

Corruption is too expensive to the extent that it impoverishes the majority and makes the minority “corruptly rich”. This is neither good for the majority nor the minority. This is what is called the “lose-lose” situation for both are terribly exposed. The majority may not have value for money and opportunities may not be created for their well-being.

For the “corruptly rich” minority, they may lose their positions in office, be incarcerated, even kicked out of government and above all suffer irreparable reputational damage. This has happened in Ghana and continues to happen because the leader is not completely dead to corrupt practices yet.

It does not need only honesty and integrity to kill oneself to corruption but courage and boldness. Apart from self you’re dealing with human nature and systems that are very complex.

It took Joshua courage and boldness to be able to circumcise elderly Israeli men in the wilderness before they were able to reach the “promised land”. No wonder, in the first nine verses of Joshua Chapter 1, God told Joshua to be “strong and courageous” three times.

Ghana also wants to get to its “promised land”. Where there would be opportunities for all, value for money in quality roads, education, medical care and, of course, sustainable power. The majority will win and the minority will also win. There will be “work and happiness” in this “win-win’ situation.

This is a leadership call and I am very confident that the response will be positive.


Peter Ekow Ansah Baidoo, Accra.

Writer’s email: eansahbaidoo@yahoo.com


Agricultural Development Bank

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